KHALED TAKRETI, LIBERTES. Paintings 2007-2022.

From 12 September to 13 November - Galerie Claude Lemand

  • Takreti, Joujoux, Hiboux, Cailloux (Les Grands Enfants).

    Joujoux, Hiboux, Cailloux (Les Grands Enfants), 2007-2008. Acrylic on paper on canvas, 130 x 320 cm. Private Collection. © Khaled Takreti. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

  • Takreti, Bike 4.

    Bike 4, 2016. Acrylic on canvas, 130 x 195 cm. © Khaled Takreti. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

  • Takreti, Bike 5.

    Bike 5, 2016. Acrylic on canvas, 114 x 146 cm. © Khaled Takreti. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

  • TAKRETI, Souad Hosni.

    Souad Hosni, 2015. Acrylic on canvas, 162 x 97 cm. © Khaled Takreti. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

  • TAKRETI, Nadia Gamal.

    Nadia Gamal, 2015. Acrylic on canvas, 162 x 97 cm. © Khaled Takreti. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

  • TAKRETI, Bike 2.

    Bike 2, 2014. Acrylic on canvas, 114 x 146 cm. © Khaled Takreti. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

  • TAKRETI, Rire et sourire 1.

    Rire et sourire 1, 2022. Acrylic on canvas, 100 x 80 cm. Copyright Khaled Takreti. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

  • TAKRETI, Rire et sourire 2.

    Rire et sourire 2, 2022. Acrylic on canvas, 100 x 80 cm. Copyright Khaled Takreti. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

KHALED TAKRETI - POP ARTIST.

- Presentation by Thierry Savatier, Art historian.

Khaled Takreti is a singular artist. When he is not painting portraits or anonymous characters, he recurrently uses irony and self-mockery in his works. His astonishing self-portrait Bike 1 (2012), where he depicts himself on a bicycle, merging man and object into a single entity. This approach is not meant to elicit an easy laugh. For the artist, as for Kierkegaard, humor always rests on a background of seriousness and, with him, just as much on an underlying work of introspection. Thus, Joujoux, Hiboux, Cailloux (2007) certainly stages strange, baroque, picturesque characters, in acid tones, placed on backgrounds made up of large colored flat areas. However, the suggested Pop’art aesthetic should hardly be taken at face value, because the melancholic faces and attitudes betray, when we linger on them, an unspoken heavy with meaning whose interpretation is left to the viewer. .

His pictorial language, very close to Pop art, allows him to approach the failings of the world around him (for example the excesses linked to the consumer society, the restrictions of freedom) with a sarcastic humor tinged with self-mockery, when he includes his own image in his composition. However, this humor rests on an obvious basis of seriousness; it seems to correspond to the brilliant definition given by Chris Marker: “the politeness of despair” and always translates a second degree.

Copyright © Galerie Claude Lemand 2012.

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