DIA AL-AZZAWI, SCULPTURES.

From 2 June to 30 August 2017 - Espace Claude Lemand

  • Dia Al-Azzawi, Sculpture, Desert Flower Monument.

    Desert Flower Monument, 2010. Original bronze, 250 x 145 x 75 cm. Signed and numbered. Edition of 6. Sold with a Certificate of Authenticity. Claude Lemand Art Publisher. © Dia Al-Azzawi. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

  • Dia Al-Azzawi, Sculpture, From Mesopotamia.

    From Mesopotamia, 1979. Original bronze, 62 x 52 x 16 cm. Signed and numbered. Edition of 8. Claude Lemand Art Publisher. © Dia Al-Azzawi. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

  • Dia Al-Azzawi, Sculpture, Arabic Letter.

    Arabic Letter, 1984. Original bronze, 30 x 32 x 9 cm. Claude Lemand Art Publisher. © Dia Al-Azzawi. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

  • Dia Al-Azzawi, Sculpture, The Target.

    The Target, 2010. Original bronze, signed and numbered, 48 x 68 x 13 cm. Edition of 7 + 2 AP. © Dia Al-Azzawi. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

  • Dia Al-Azzawi, Sculpture, El Suspiro del Moro.

    El Suspiro del Moro, 2014. Original bronze, signed and numbered, 48 x 86 x 18 cm. Edition of 7 + 2 AP. © Dia Al-Azzawi. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

DIA AL-AZZAWI, SCULPTURES.

« An Iraqi living in London, Dia Al-Azzawi is a pioneer of con­tem­po­rary Arab art. He could well be the Picasso that the East was lacking. Not only for his vibrant black and white polyp­tych depicting the mas­sacre of Sabra and Chatila. (…)

Having worked for a long time in the sector of con­ser­va­tion of his home country’s antiq­ui­ties, his inspi­ra­tion derives from mem­o­ries and from the ground in order to chal­lenge time and men. He fuses the elon­gated Sumerian, Babylonian and Assyrian shapes with the nat­ural sed­i­men­ta­tion of desert roses. His bright colours derive from the kilims tra­di­tion­ally worn by the women in southern Iraq whilst his sur­re­al­istic decon­struc­tions res­onate modern British sculp­ture. His ritual and time-honoured sculp­ture, in front of which one must look up to as if standing before a text of laws, pre­sents itself as a series of steles that are simul­ta­ne­ously joyful and fune­real, as they draw the atten­tion of the people alive to com­mem­o­rate the dead. » (Emmanuel Daydé)


« No, there is no Iraqi, Syrian or Moroccan art. For the first time in the his­tory of Arab art, the artist feels that he is part of the world. Civilization is a pro­ject of Humanity. I there­fore strive to pro­duce works that fall within the cul­ture of the entire humanity. » (Dia Al-Azzawi)

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